Kimono for a Modern Age

The Pavilion for Japanese Art
July 5, 2014–October 19, 2014

A blend of the traditional and the modern characterized life and dress during Japan’s Meiji (1868–1912), Taishō (1912–1926) and Shōwa (1926–1989) periods. During the early 20th century, a majority of Japanese women continued to wear traditional kimono. But, as demonstrated in the exhibition, the kimono evolved to reflect the introduction of vibrant synthetic colors, new modes of textile production, and bold abstract and figurative design motifs, often inspired by Western art movements and important current events, such as space exploration.

Kimono for a Modern Age features more than thirty captivating examples from LACMA’s permanent collection exhibited for the first time.

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Image: Woman’s Kimono (kosode) with Abstract Hemp-Leaf Pattern, Japan, late Taisho+ (1912-1926) – early Sho+wa (1926–1989) period, Silk plain weave, stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyo+-kasuri meisen), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Costume Council Fund, M.2012.130.9.

Kimono

Sueko Oshimoto, a kimono master and costume designer at Suehiro Kimono in North Hollywood demonstrates the technique of proper kimono dressing.

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