Exhibition Themes: For Dressing, Dining and Doses

Dressing

Box, 1730–1740, Saint-Cloud Porcelain Manufactory, Saint-Cloud, France, c. 1693–1766 Soft-paste porcelain with glaze and enamel, The MaryLou Boone Collection, 1997.107, cat. no. 76

This rare box may have been placed on the dressing table, to hold small items. The custom of storing small objects in a tied scarf or handkerchief was widespread at this time, particularly among the working classes, so this Saint-Cloud creation is a charming visual play on both material and form.

Dining

Sugar Box, c. 1748 Vincennes Porcelain Manufactory, Vincennes, France, c. 1740–1756, Soft-paste porcelain with glaze and enamel, The Huntington Art Collections, Gift of MaryLou Boone, 2010.6.19

Cup and Saucer (Gobelet, or Tasse, à la reine), c. 1746, Vincennes Porcelain Manufactory, Vincennes, France,  c. 1740–1756, Soft-paste porcelain with glaze and enamel, The Huntington Art Collections, Gift of MaryLou Boone, 2010.6.19

The cup, saucer and sugar box were probably part of a breakfast service. The detailed narrative scenes drawn from classical mythology form a unified program of female protagonists engaged in amorous activities. The set may have been commissioned by a woman desirous of being delighted, amused and titillated—possibly Madame de Pompadour herself.

Dosing

Apothecary Jar, c. 1660–1680 Earthenware with tin glaze and enamel (grand feu faïence), Nevers, France, The Huntington Art Collections, Gift of MaryLou Boone, 2010.6.5, cat. no. 7

The form of this vessel suggests that it was used as an apothecary jar. The vertical lip suggests the jar originally had a lid, now lost, that would have fit over it. The jar is decorated with Chinese-inspired ornament, including landscape scenes, scrolls which resemble stylized clouds, and Asian floral designs.

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