This Weekend at LACMA: Stephen Prina Opens, a Double Dose of Sci-fi, and More

There’s always something new to discover at LACMA. This weekend is no exception. Debuting on Sunday is Stephen Prina: As He Remembered It. L.A.-based artist Stephen Prina’s installation consists of twenty-eight pieces of furniture painted pink (Pantone Honeysuckle 2011 Color of the Year, to be precise) and arranged to follow the lines of the room. Read more about our newest exhibition and its origins on Unframed. As always, LACMA members see it first—member previews are open right now.

Installation view: Stephen Prina, As He Remembered It (detail), 2011, Los Angeles CountyMuseum of Art, © Stephen Prina; courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, and PetzelGallery, New York, photo © 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

Installation view: Stephen Prina, As He Remembered It (detail), 2011, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, © Stephen Prina; courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, and Petzel Gallery, New York, photo © 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

This exhibition is part of Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A., a series of exhibitions and programs that celebrate the city’s modern architectural heritage. Other arts centers, like the Southern California Institute of Architecture and the J. Paul Getty Museum, are participating as well and have exhibitions on view through July. Check out the Pacific Standard Time website for details on the many other related exhibitions.

Our science-fiction film series, Beyond the Infinite: Science Fiction After Kubrick, concludes with a double-feature tonight. In Robert Altman’s Quintet, Paul Newman wanders through a snowy wasteland into the ruins of a frozen city where he ends up embroiled in a life-threatening game as one of the last members of the human race. The Man Who Fell to Earth caps off the evening with the big screen debut of David Bowie as a derelict extraterrestrial looking to save his home planet, while struggling to overcome the material indulgences of modern man. Originally cut by more than twenty minutes for its U.S. theatrical release, it has now been fully restored.

While you’re here enjoying Stephen Prina and the sci-fi film series, take the opportunity to explore some of our other wonderful exhibitions. For example, in the South and Southeast Asian Art galleries you can see The Temptation of Arjuna: A Tale of Spiritual Triumph, an exhibition that showcases the recent acquisition of a rare Balinese painting. These narrative paintings decorated palace pavilions during royal ceremonies and ritual festivities in the early twentieth century in Bali. Alongside this piece you’ll find a pair of batik garments from the north coast of Java from the same period.

Temptation of Arjuna (detail), Indonesia, Bali, possibly Kamasan (Klungkung), early 20th century, purchased with funds provided by the Southern Asian Art Council, the Ethnic Arts Council, Paula Fouce, Linda Jayne in memory of Allen Jayne, Mark Johnson in memory of Jo Jean Johnson, Arline Lloyd in memory of David Lloyd, Lisa Gimmy, and the South and Southeast Asian Art Deaccession Fund

Temptation of Arjuna (detail), Indonesia, Bali, possibly Kamasan (Klungkung), early 20th century, purchased with funds provided by the Southern Asian Art Council, the Ethnic Arts Council, Paula Fouce, Linda Jayne in memory of Allen Jayne, Mark Johnson in memory of Jo Jean Johnson, Arline Lloyd in memory of David Lloyd, Lisa Gimmy, and the South and Southeast Asian Art Deaccession Fund

This weekend at LACMA also has free family tours on Saturday, free guided tours Saturday and Sunday, free Andell Family Sundays, and a free classical music concert Sunday evening. Find the full schedule here. Did we mention they’re free?

One last thing: no one likes to think about Monday at this point, but—the international premiere of Takashi Murakami’s directorial debut, Jellyfish Eyes, will be held in the Bing Theater at 7:30 pm, followed by a Q&A with the director (thanks to our friends at Film Independent). It’s not “this weekend” but it’s pretty special, so mark your calendars.

Roberto Ayala